Making the case for Going Green

I’ve recently picked up a book by Rich Roll, called Finding Ultra, and it provided me with the push I needed to explore what a plant-based diet has to offer. In the past I’ve experimented with a Paleo diet and for some time I followed the strict version thereof with good results. Before delving into the ‘why’ of following a plant-based diet I’ll share a few thoughts on dieting in general.

The first is that no two bodies are the same and what works for one is not necessarily going to work for the other. The second is that you should not blindly listen to or follow any health guru or expert. Do your own research, experiment with different food types and protocols. Listen to your body, it’ll tell what works and what not.

Then be clear on the ‘why’. If you can’t convince yourself why you’re doing something, you’ll give up on it. That simple. If you are going to make such a change you are guaranteed to be met with resistance and even ridicule. Funny how all your junk food eating friends (and even family) suddenly become nutritional experts the minute you mention you’re going vegan…

I have three big reasons for experimenting with ‘going green’. The first is that I’m constantly seeking to maximize my athletic performance, stave off the onset of illness and disease, and ensuring optimum long-term wellness for myself and my family. It’s about living healthy for me. I’m a long way off from finding ‘my ultra’ but I’m trying to and at the moment, relishing the challenge.

The second reason is about changing habits. I have many bad habits that I’d like to get rid off and if I can succeed in changing the way I eat, it’ll give me the confidence and courage to change the way I live. Altering habits (eliminating the bad ones) is the first step in creating a sustainable and stable foundation for long-term wellness. It’s about becoming better (not only fitter).

The third is that by going green I contribute to making this planet better. And without boring you with statistics and data, chew on this: The population is growing and we’re not doing a very good job in feeding all the mouths. Our methods are not sustainable and they’re seriously harming Mother Earth in the process. Every day you take your animal products off your plate and replace them with plants – not only are you immunizing against the many chronic lifestyle diseases, it saves (on average) an extraordinary 1000 gallons of water, 30 square feet of forested land, 20 pounds of CO2 equivalent and one animal’s life. That’s something worth doing – at least I think so. (Animal agriculture is the the number one culprit when it comes to almost every man-made environmental ill on the planet. It accounts for more greenhouse gas emissions than the entire transport sector combined. It accounts for 91% of Amazon destruction. I can go on, the stats are alarming…it’s responsible for mass extinction and buggering up the ocean. Ok, I’ll stop there.)

Following a plant-based diet does not have to be complicated. If it’s overly complicated it is not sustainable and trying something you can’t sustain is pointless. In short, eat plant-based whole foods and stay away from processed food. Look to eat all kinds of plants. Every meal, all the time. All colors and sizes and as simply prepared as possible. Try to eat organic and opt for locally produced when possible. There’s a million books on this, get your hands on a few of them and follow the advice with regard to recipes and shopping lists. It’s easier than you think. Oh, and if you’re an athlete and worried about protein, you don’t need to be. The research has been done, there’s ways to manage that and the info is available and free of charge.

When I switched to eating plants this happened: Meal prep and cooking time were greatly reduced. Chopping up an avo, a couple of tomatoes and adding veggies like oven roasted butternut and beetroot took mere minutes, leaving me with more time for reading, exercising etc. Sunday lunches used to be a big thing in our house. A leg of lamb would be placed in the oven, cooking for hours on end. Preparing Sunday lunch literally took the whole morning to do. Now instead of standing guard in front of the oven we can actually get out of the house and go do stuff.

Plant-based meals are cheaper to prepare than meat-based meals for example. I live in a country where chicken is considered a vegetable. People here eat meat, and lots of it. Not buying meat has greatly reduced my grocery bill.

I lost the last few stubborn pounds I could not get rid off while eating meals that included animal products. Weight loss was not my greatest motivator and neither should it be yours but running and swimming, and even biking is just so much easier without carrying any ‘excess baggage’. Granted, I’m training harder and longer than ever before, but I’m sustaining it on a plant-based diet. Power increased while weight decreased. The benefits are obvious and more importantly I’m feeling good. A recent visit to my internist confirmed what I was feeling. Reduced cholesterol, reduced uric acid, higher levels of ‘good cholesterol’ etc. Point is I’m fitter, healthier and stronger than ever before. And the numbers confirm it – both in terms of athletic performance and medical evaluations.

For me it was and still is much more than changing the food that goes down my throat. It’s about changing who and how I am. It is as much about long-term wellness as it is about becoming a better person. Eliminating bad habits while at the same time eliminating limiting beliefs. It is about taking on challenges I previously thought was impossible to conquer. It is about slowly but surely unlocking the deep reserves of human potential I, and each one of us, are carrying inside of us and speeding up the journey towards becoming the best and most authentic version of myself. So far so good. I dare you to give it a go.

Advertisements

Becoming a Happy Camper

Camping per se means that you left the comforts of home and embarked on a journey. So many people meander through life without ever leaving their comfort zones. Although death is tragic, there’s nothing more heartbreaking than being alive and not living. Note to self: Magic does not happen in a comfort zone, it happens beyond its borders.

It is an old cliche, life is a journey and if you want to experience the magic of truly living you’ll have to leave your comfort zone and wander bravely into the unknown. In order for your journey to have purpose and a realistic chance of success you’ll need a good and proper base camp.

The Oxford Dictionary defines a base camp as ‘a camp from where people start their journey when climbing high mountains.’ Another (wikipedia) definition specifically refers to a base camp as ‘a place of preparation’. I like both definitions. The first implies that a base camp is required when chasing lofty goals while the other suggests that a base camp is where you prepare yourself before setting off for the summit (your goal).

It’s therefore clear that your base camp needs to be well stocked with whatever provisions, tools and equipment you’ll need on your journey to the summit. It should be a place where you’ll receive nurture and rest before tackling your objective. It should provide you with shelter while waiting for the perfect opportunity to push for the summit. It should be a place where you receive encouragement and advice from people sharing the same values and goals.

Your base camp should be inhabited by the right people. Pick the wrong people to man your camp – negative personalities – and you’re setting yourself up for judgement and criticism that will most probably deflate your spirit and derail your progress. It is of crucial importance to pick the people you confide in wisely. In other words, the strength of your base camp community will ultimately determine your success.

They say that you’re the average of the five people with whom you spend the most time. Take control of your inner circle and if necessary upgrade. Actively seek out positive and inspirational people and spend time with them. Seek their counsel and advice. Look for those who share your values and values your dreams.

If you are currently surrounded by people who drag you down, who constantly questions your actions and bombards you with criticism born out of jealousy, its time for some tough decisions. These decisions will be even tougher if these nay-sayers are the ones closest to you. Excising them completely from your life might not be an option or even possible but you can choose what you share with them. You can de-escalate the intimacy of the relationship. You can deny them space in your head by carefully choosing what you share and what you don’t share with them. Sounds selfish? Self-respecting people won’t tolerate negative relationships and neither should you. Maintaining such relationships might be sign of poor self-esteem. You might think that you don’t deserve better relationships. Discard that limiting believe. You owe it to yourself to surround you with people that inspires you, that elevates you and most importantly that believes in you.

Banish the negative, pessimistic personalities from your base camp. Time spent with them is time wasted. It is that simple. Making it into base camp already shows that you’ve committed yourself to a hero’s journey. It is time to stop being the supporting actor and act like the hero.

Another thought about the people in your base camp is this: The overall health (or strength) of the camp depends on the health of the individuals and the health of the individuals depends on the health of the camp. Successful mountaineers know that they must spend as much time, if not more, in tending to their base camp as they do on actually climbing mountains. Devoting too much time on reaching summits will lead to the deterioration of the base camp. That’s why a man constantly climbing the corporate ladder might return one day to find his house in shambles and his spouse gone. The other side of the coin also holds true. The wife thinking that just being in base camp is her summit cannot understand or empathise with her husband’s need for achievement and reacts to them with jealousy and never-ending demands that he must devote more of his energy to the home. Sooner or later the husband will suffocate and flee the camp.

The ideal is then for a community or relationship to exist for the primary purpose of nurturing each of the individual participants for their individual journeys towards their own goals. Genuine love not only respects the individuality of the other but actually seeks to cultivate it, even at the risk of separation or loss. The ultimate goal (in life) remains the (spiritual) growth of the individual, the solitary journey to peaks that can only be climbed alone – for it is the sacrifices made on behalf of the growth of the other that result in the the equal or even greater growth of the self. It is the return of the individual from the peaks he or she has traveled to alone which serves to elevate the base camp community (or the relationship). In this way individual growth and that of the people you surround yourself with are interdependent, but it is always and inevitably lonely out on the (summit) growing edge…

Getting your base camp right (well stocked and manned by people that inspires you) will not only launch you onto those growing edges but it will make the return from those edges the highlight of your journey. Similarly, so will the summits reached by those around you fill you with the same gratitude and purpose as the summits you conquered yourself.

The Power of Community – an underrated tool

funny-aerobicsThe other day my daughter had to prepare a short talk on ‘spectators’ and their influence on her life. She started off by stating that two is better than one and then went on to describe how we all are spectators of each others’ lives and that merely standing by and observing doesn’t cut it and that it is only when we give something of ourselves that we truly get involved in the game and transform ourselves from passive onlookers to active participants, thereby tasting what life is really about. A proper mouthful for a 16 year-old.

It made me think. On how many roads have I embarked just to be turned around without reaching my intended destination. Dozens, no, more. Now, with the power of hindsight, I’m not in the least bit surprised that on each of those journeys I’ve set off alone.

I won’t bore you with the tearful details of each (perceived) failure but I will say this: Had I embarked on those journeys WITH someone or at least FOR someone other than myself, I would in all likelihood have reached the destination.

The power of community is often overlooked and underestimated. It is especially true if your goal is reaching a place where you’re fit and healthy. Improving your health (and therefore your fitness) requires focused intention and consistent effort. It requires discipline when it comes to making daily choices. What it comes down to is changing habits and as we all know, changing habits is hard. Especially if you’re trying to do it alone.

Being part of a community, or harnessing the power of ‘togetherness’ is a powerful tool. And it is out there, and it is free. Being engaged in community will improve your health – and not just physically. Conversely, isolation will prevent you from becoming the best version of yourself. Alcoholics for example don’t get drunk in groups, they do however try to heal in groups.

Here’s the kicker: Health habits are contagious. For example, if you spend time with people who exercise, you are more likely to exercise. Same with eating healthy. The group you associate with often determines the type of person you become. This does not mean you should ditch all your fat friends. You are not only capable of being influenced, you can influence as well. If you keep healthy habits, friends and family are more likely to follow. Like I said, habits are contagious which means you can have a significant effect on those around you.

It won’t happen overnight however. You will most likely encounter some resistance. Chewing on a carrot while your friends are puffing away will draw the odd comment of resentment. By the way, that should be your sign that just maybe you’re associating with the wrong crowd.

And then there’s the small matter of ‘commitment’. To most commitment does not come naturally, we’d rather opt for the ‘no obligations’ route than be tied up, missing the point that commitment actually gives us freedom. The freedom to be who we want to be because it is only in the confines of relationships that we can let our hair down. Or fart out loud.

There is also comfort in knowing that we’re not alone in our battle to stay on track with our fitness and health goals. And being committed to a group or a couple of friends will cause them to be committed to you, dragging you along even on those days when you’re not feeling up for it.

You need not look far to start forging such bonds. Co-workers, neighbors, friends, parents of your kids’ friends – in today’s world of connections, groups and social media it should be quite easy to find a few like-minded individuals. A great place to start can be your immediate family. It’s a fact that couples who train together, are more likely to stay together so just maybe you don’t need to look any further than your better-half. After getting your better-half on board don’t be surprised if the kids follow suit. You might have started off thinking that you’ll be the inspiration but more often than not you’ll find that once those bonds have been established, you’re the one that is inspired for once you are surrounded by others who are just as committed to ‘loving thy neighbor’ as you are, you become the recipient of that ‘love’ as well as the giver of it. And only then will you transform yourself from a passive onlooker to an active participant in the joyous game we call ‘Life’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tips from a Stay-at-Home Dad.

Dad

Being a stay-at-home-dad (SAHD) is the most rewarding, yet the most difficult thing I’ve ever done. Never has the ‘all worthwhile things are hard-saying’ been more true for me.

It is difficult for a number of reasons:

It is not the norm. The world, society, call it what you want, dictates that the man be the breadwinner and the wife the caretaker. Men are wired to go out and earn a living while women are wired to take care of the household and raise kids. The point most are missing is this: Taking charge of the household, family finances and raising the kids are as necessary a task as earning money. The parent responsible for this, irrespective of gender, is contributing to the welfare of the family. Raising kids, for example, is not an innately feminine thing.

Because of the many misconceptions, stay-at-home dads will struggle with confidence while the working moms will just as often buckle under the pressure of being sole breadwinners. This puts more pressure on the marriage than is necessary.

Tip No 1: Becoming SAHD should be a conscious decision made by ALL parties involved. Yes, I understand that circumstances might force your hand (losing your job through no fault of your own) but in the end, what you do with what happened to you is still a choice. Like I mentioned above, your wife suddenly becoming the sole breadwinner will put her under pressure. It will strain your relationship and even more so when she perceives her situation forced upon her. Similarly, if you think that you have been forced to become a SAHD you will take three times as long to truly embrace your role compared to having made that choice yourself. So, sit down, talk to your wife, talk to your kids, make a decision – then embrace the role.

Tip No 2: Run your family (household) like a business. It will give you purpose and besides, its fun. And if somebody asks you what it is that you’re doing, you can answer them: I’m the family manager, I’m running the show. For example, divide the ‘family tasks’  into categories:

  • Finances
  • Food
  • Family and Friends
  • Time and Scheduling
  • Special events
  • Self-management

Then delegate the tasks to those best suited for them. For example, let the kids take charge of ‘special events’ such as birthdays etc while you handle the family budget. Just because your wife is earning the money should not mean you can’t take charge of the family budget, shoulder the big decisions and take responsibility for paying the bills. Just as you can take some of the ‘financial’ pressure off your wife, she can give you a hand (or ideas) on the food-front. The idea is to identify the weak areas and to seek help where you need it.

You can even take the model further by branding your family, complete with a logo, a slogan and core values. This is a lot of fun and gets everybody involved. More on that later…

Tip No 3: Get your shit together. You are now the ‘lead guide’ of your household and if the family is having a bad day it is likely because you didn’t manage the day well. There’s a lot of planning to do. Meals, shopping, chores and the kids’ schedule will wreak havoc with your time (and to a lesser extent, your finances) if you fail to plan properly. Sundays are great for family meetings during which you can discuss the dinner menu for the week, draft your shopping list and plan your schedule for the week. Planning properly will also reveal that you do have time to pursue some ‘ME’ stuff. Like getting fit, working on that hobby of yours AND even time to earn decent money while being a SAHD! Thereby showing the finger to the many misconceptions out there. Misconceptions such as ‘he lost his job’ or ‘he’s probably looking for a job’ or ‘he does not have any motivation’ etc., etc.

Tip No 4: Have fun. Though the number of SAHD’s is on the increase, and what you do is not as rare as you think, you are still very fortunate to be spending quantity and quality time with your children. Spend as much time playing with your kids as you do trying to accomplish all the other household chores that comes with the job. Make a conscious effort to devote some part of your day to playing. It’s a terrible cliche but time does go by so fast. Blink an eye and your kids will be off to school, blink again and they’ll ask for the keys to your car…

To wrap up, fulfillment comes from making a difference in the lives of other people and a SAHD has a unique and special opportunity to make a profound difference in the lives of those he hold dearest. Remember, the most valuable asset you have is your time and knowing that you invested it wisely into the lives of your wife and your kids and experiencing their appreciation will leave you fulfilled and ultimately happy.

O, and realizing and understanding that your time is valuable will put an end to the procrastination and will get the things you’ve always wanted to get done, done!